Home News Ag Economics $1.9 Million in Grants to Support Transition to Safer, Sustainable Pest Management in California

$1.9 Million in Grants to Support Transition to Safer, Sustainable Pest Management in California

The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) has opened $1.9 million in available funding to support integrated pest management (IPM) projects that expand available tools, resources and practices that increase the adoption of IPM and support a statewide transition to sustainable pest management.

Sustainable pest management builds on the existing practices of IPM to incorporate broadened considerations of human health and social equity, environmental protections and economic viability in the way pests are managed in agricultural, urban and wildland settings.

The funding announced today is available through the 2024 Alliance and Research Grants programs. In the past 20 years, these programs have awarded more than $26 million for more than 100 projects that advance the use of IPM and ultimately increase the adoption of more sustainable methods for managing pests that are safer for people and the environment.

“To accelerate the systemwide adoption of sustainable pest management across the state, we need to both build a suite of effective alternatives to higher risk pesticides and expand the knowledge, technical assistance and practical resources for growers and urban pest managers to manage pests in the safest, effective way for people and the environment,” said DPR Director Julie Henderson.

The 2024 Research and Alliance Grants programs are seeking projects that address one or more of the following examples of priority topic areas:

  • IPM resources for underserved or disadvantaged communities or for small growing operations
  • Decreasing the use of high-risk, high-volume pesticides (for example: fumigants)
  • Tools, strategies and resources for IPM and sustainable pest management use in agricultural areas near school sites and urban settings
  • Incorporating the sustainability pillars of broadened considerations of human health and social equity, environmental protections and economic vitality as outlined in the Sustainable Pest Management RoadmapPreviously funded Research and Alliance Grant projects include:
    • Researching the use of RNA interference, antimicrobial peptides, and sterile insect techniques to effectively manage pests.
    • Providing culturally relevant and accessible education programs promoting IPM practices to residents in low-income communities of color.
    • Promoting the adoption of short wavelength ultraviolet lights (UV-C) to manage pests in California strawberries.

    The 2024 Research Grants Program has up to $800,000 to award for projects of up to three years in length. Projects should develop pest management tools and practices to reduce the use of high-risk pesticides or decrease the impacts of pesticide use on human health and the environment. Project budgets may range from $50,000 to $500,000. Research Grant applications will be accepted through Sept. 14.

    The 2024 Alliance Grants Program has up to $1.1 million to award for projects of up to three years in length. Projects should promote or increase sustainable pest management though the implementation, expansion, or adoption of effective, proven and affordable IPM systems or practices. Project budgets may range from $50,000 to $800,000. Alliance Grant applications will be accepted through Jan. 18, 2024.

    For more information on the Alliance Grants and Research Grants programs, including how to apply, please visit the Department of Pesticide Regulation Grants website.

    ABOUT THE DEPARTMENT OF PESTICIDE REGULATION

    The California Department of Pesticide Regulation’s mission is to protect human health and the environment by fostering safer and sustainable pest management practices and operating a robust regulatory system to monitor and manage the sale and use of pesticides across the state. DPR’s work includes registering all pesticides sold or used in California, conducting scientific evaluation of pesticides to assess and mitigate potential harm to human health or the environment, monitoring for pesticides in the air and water, and enforcing pesticide regulations in coordination with 55 County Agriculture Commissioners and their 500 field inspectors. DPR also conducts outreach to ensure pesticide workers, farmworkers and local communities have access to safety information. DPR invests in innovative research to encourage the development and adoption of integrated pest management tools and practices. More information about DPR can be found at www.cdpr.ca.gov.

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